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Cream of Sago Pudding with a Lemon Meringue Topping Recipe

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Absolutely sublime! You will NEVER guess its sago you are eating!
Combine cinnamon, & or nutmeg, or both if you like, this sago pudding is creamy, dreamy & absolutely delicious! It’s my own creation & off the back of many other recipe ideas!
This recipe's secret to success is to allow sufficient time for the sago starch to become translucent by soaking it in milk well overnight, before baking it at a low temperature. Use egg whites at room temperature and without any traces of egg yolks.
The bowl of the mixer and the beater should be spotless. Even a minuscule drop of grease can ruin the dessert.
Whip the egg whites until triple in volume, and firm. Do not let them become grainy
Have the oven ready, and hot water for the water bath or bain marie (I baked without hotwater bath & if using hot water bath, do not use boiling water.
For the custard: never allow the egg yolk-sugar-milk mixture to boil, because the heat will curdle the preparation and you will end up with unappealing sweet scrambled eggs.

Makes 12-16 portions.
1. Serve warm or cold. *Best left overnight in oven once baking completed. (Prevents shrinkage of meringue topping). Served on following day. *Use fresh eggs. *Internal temperature must reach at 160 deg C to prevent Salmonella poisoning from the eggs. *You must use a clean, dry grease free stainless steel or copper bowl to whip up the egg whites. Use egg whites at room temperature and without any traces of egg yolks.
The bowl of the mixer and the beater should be spotless. Even a minuscule drop of yolk or grease (& it is on your fingers too!) can ruin all the dessert.
TIP: I make sure my hands are clean when separating yolks from the whites. I find the safest way to do this, is to use your fingers, allowing the whites to safely slip through & is far less riskier than tossing yolks from broken egg shell to broken egg shell, where they can easily get punctured by the sharp edges around shells.
Whip the egg whites until triple in volume, and firm. Do not let them become grainy
Have the oven ready, and hot water for the water bath or bain marie. Do not use boiling water.
For the custard: never allow the egg yolk-sugar-milk mixture to boil, because the heat will curdle the preparation and you will end up with unappealing sweet scrambled eggs. *Egg yolks get blended into your (heated but not boiling mixture) mixture on very last minute, right before going to oven.

*The secret: Boiling the sago / tapioca pearls the day before waiting 12 hours, boiling them (Do not allow milk to boil over!). Again and after baking, leave in oven & wait another three hours or more before serving.


Cook time:
Servings: (12 – 16 servings) (12 – 16 servings)
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Ingredients

Cost per recipe $2.48 view details
  • 140 g (200 ml) sago
  • 1 whole cinnamon roll or few sticks tied in bag (¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg optional)
  • 1,600 ml milk / 1,536 grams milk
  • 110 g (137.5ml) castor sugar (I just run ordinary sugar through the grinder)
  • Pinch salt
  • 2.5ml baking powder...“Is what I’ve used but next test will try 5ml baking powder for extra added lightness”
  • 15ml Vanilla Essence
  • 45g butter
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 1 roll cinnamon broken up & ground together with a tablespoon sugar
  • 6 egg whites
  • 360 ml castor sugar. (Use 60-65ml per egg white)
  • 5 ml baking powder Lemon juice about 30ml added drip or drip / 2ml Cream of tartar which helps to stabilize & stiffen meringue
  • 5ml baking powder. (Whisk in very last moment, once your meringue has achieved stiff peaks & is ready for slathering onto top of sago pudding)

Directions

  1. •
  2. Method
  3. 1. Bring milk and cinnamon roll / sticks to boiling point in a 2 litre container.
  4. 2. Add sago and cover the dish. Leave to soak at 12 hours overnight. Cool down. Refrigerate before bed. Do not allow milk to go sour!
  5. 3. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  6. 4. Reheat the mixture again. Using a stick blender, whisk it into a cream.
  7. 5. Bring the milk mixture to the boil and thoroughly whisk the mixture again, for at least 2 minutes or until you have smooth & creamy sago custard (No frog’s eggs). Ensure that the sago is completely silky smooth. Stick blender is best for this job or you will have to settle for the frogs eggs.
  8. 6. Remove the cinnamon and beat the sugar butter and salt into the warm mixture. (Here I try to cook my sago very well before adding the egg yolks to shorten the baking time. Electricity is expensive now days!) *Do not cook the mixture any further once the egg yolks have been added!
  9. 7. Allow to cool slightly. Whisk in eggs yolks, vanilla and the optional grated nutmeg if using together with baking powder added on the last moment and whisk it quickly into the cooling-down mixture.
  10. 8. Pour into a buttered 2-litre dish. *A sprinkling of cake crumbs over the top before placing on your meringue topping (Freshly ground cinnamon sugar) between the filling and the meringue helps absorb this moisture. It does work and I do use this method.
  11. 9. Half-fill a larger, shallow dish and dust the surface of sago custard with your cinnamon sugar and place your sago dish in it to create a bain-marie (Hot water bath). Not necessary this stage I skipped & still it came out wonderful!
  12. 10. Bake for 90 minutes until firm and golden brown.
  13. To make the meringue:
  14. Beat the egg whites till nice and fluffy. Slowly bit for bit start adding your sugar spoon for spoon, alternating with freshly squeezed lemon/lime juice/cream of tartar. Whilst beating continuously, do not stop! Once it starts stiffening you may beat in your vanilla followed by your baking powder. Beat continuously till stiff peaks form. On high moisture/rainy days you might need to add a just a tad more sugar. Do not get any yolk or fats in your meringue or it will not achieve its peaks.
  15. 1. Add cream of tartar to egg whites and beat into soft mounds, while you gradually add 2 tablespoons sugar.
  16. 2. Dust top of your filling with freshly ground cinnamon sugar/nutmeg sugar/biscuit crumbs. Spread meringue over your hot filling (Prevents it from weeping & sliding off) & make sure you glue meringue to edges of crust / dish. I placed mine on warm (not hot filling and was fine). Dust with cinnamon if wish.
  17. 3. Bake for about 20 - 40 minutes until meringue is light golden brown on top.
  18. Serve warm or cold. A Mumsey Creation -22nd July 2012.
  19. Chefs Tips: There are ways to minimize weeping, a few tricks and tips. And obviously, a well made meringue will hold up longer and weep less than a poorly made meringue, so execution is important. Unfortunately there isn't much consensus on HOW to make a meringue perfectly for a pie.
  20. Specifically, I'm referring to the hot filling/cold filling lemon meringue pie debate.
  21. Some feel that a piping hot filling is the best method, as it provides heat to the bottom of the meringue while the heat from the oven cooks the top. This does make sense, since heat help set the proteins and this buys you time when it comes to weeping. Still, by the time the pie fully cools, there is usually a little weeping to contend with. *A sprinkling of cake crumbs (Freshly ground cinnamon sugar) between the filling and the meringue helps absorb this moisture. It does work and I do use this method. However with mile-high meringues, it can be difficult to ensure adequate heat throughout and by the time your filling cools enough to serve you may find yourself with a bit more moisture than desired.
  22. Others feel that the meringue is best put onto a chilled pie. Simply top the chilled pie with meringue right before serving, bake and then slice and serve at its structural zenith. Basically avoiding the whole weeping business all together. This is probably the easiest means of avoiding weeping for this particular pie.
  23. Sago is an ingredient obtained from the inner pulp of sago palm which is powdered commonly. The powder is used as a thickener for many gravies, soups or stews. It can be replaced by flour made from tapioca pearls.
  24. Sago is dried starch granules derived from the pitch of sago tree. Sago flour is very rich in starch and has the same thickening ability as tapioca flour. In fact sago and tapioca flour may be used interchangeably for making kuih, bread and cakes.
  25. Some other tapioca alternatives that you can use are sago (interchangeable weight wise & as a thickener can be swopped one for the other without altering weight amounts) starch, sweet potato starch, & sweet rice flour.
  26. 1 tablespoon of cornstarch or corn flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca/sago flour
  27. 1 tablespoon of potato starch or rice starch or flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca/sago flour
  28. 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca
  29. 1 tablespoon of Arrowroot = 2 tablespoons of instant tapioca/sago flour
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Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Recipe %DV
Recipe Size 318g
Calories 1312  
Calories from Fat 323 25%
Total Fat 36.79g 46%
Saturated Fat 23.19g 93%
Trans Fat 0.0g  
Cholesterol 97mg 32%
Sodium 2333mg 97%
Potassium 17mg 0%
Total Carbs 253.3g 68%
Dietary Fiber 0.0g 0%
Sugars 249.05g 166%
Protein 0.42g 1%

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